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Tag: thesis

Bordertown, Surveillance, and the Evil Eye

Bordertown, Surveillance, and the Evil Eye

Last summer, I participated in the Bordertown design studio, a ten-week seminar on the subject of cities divided by borders. Everyone involved developed a deliverable, which we exhibited at the Detroit Design Festival. At the time, I was too blown away by the city of Detroit and its inhabitants to talk about my own work. (Also, I was editing my debut novel and finishing work on my thesis, writing some pieces for BoingBoing and trying to find another job.) I…

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Loss Prevention: Customer Service as Border Security

Loss Prevention: Customer Service as Border Security

As you may have noticed, part of my thesis is available on BoingBoing. Assuming this whole attachment thing works as planned, the project in its entirety should be available here, now. So if you feel like reading over a hundred pages of research on wicked problems, service design, and border security, take a look!

The things that didn’t make it in:

The things that didn’t make it in:

This week, after a nightmare of last-minute changes and formatting errors, I finally turned in the print copy of my thesis to the good folks at OCAD U. It’s a design thesis for the Strategic Foresight and Innovation program, and it’s called “Loss Prevention: Customer Service as Border Security.” It’s just shy of a hundred pages long, and four of those are the bibliography. However, in any piece of writing there are always bits of information you discover at the…

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Another tidbit from my thesis:

Another tidbit from my thesis:

I’ve been having a great time writing the scenario for my thesis. I turn in another draft tomorrow, and I’m excited to be discovering some interesting new ideas in the process. Brandy caught herself wishing for one of those fancy intent detectors while interviewing Jorge Rivera. As it was, her layARs only displayed his heart condition as a pulsing red glow on his left side, and a vaguely yellow aura surrounding his head in a cautionary halo. The rest of…

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From my design thesis on the future of border security:

From my design thesis on the future of border security:

As part of my thesis for the Strategic Foresight & Innovation program at the Ontario College of Art and Design, I’m writing fictionalized scenarios on the future of “service as security” in the customs clearance context. Here’s a snippet: The communications training had gone a long way to preparing her for the transformation. Part of the qualifying exam asked multiple-choice questions about customer service. For the most part, a teenager working a retail job could answer them, but Brandy remembered…

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As luck would have it…

As luck would have it…

…I’m sitting in a dimly-lit room on Gibraltar Point, polishing my thesis and working on more stories about robots. I lucked into this place — which is beautiful, and spooky, and exactly what I need — because Peter Watts got lucky in Germany and couldn’t take his usual Point position, and offered me the spot. The turnabout happened so quickly, in fact, that his name is still on my key fob. My luck has been good, lately. Through random chance,…

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Samuel R. Delany on slash fic:

Samuel R. Delany on slash fic:

Still, the “K/S” material confirmed something that I already knew from my own life: that there are just as many heterosexual women who are turned on by the idea of men having sex with one another as there are heterosexual men who are turned on by the idea of women having sex with one another — that the engines of desire are far more complex than we usually give them credit for; and that if lesbians and gay men didn’t…

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work, work, work

work, work, work

Here is a sampling of my various projects: “There’s a present outside your window,” Singer says. Now Brandon does get up. He pads to the window and opens it. The shutters squeak dryly. Outside, hovering, is their drone: four wings, all black, her hindparts heavy with twelve hours of surveillance. “Hello, Tink,” Brandon says, extending his hand. The UAS does a brief identity check (it takes about four seconds) and flits over to his open palm. He carries her gently…

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