Canadians like it on top, Futurism

Immigration is an information design problem.

While writing this column for the Ottawa Citizen on proposed changes to Canada’s immigration policy, an idea occurred to me that had taken years to crystallize. It emerged, strange but sharp, like a thorn buried under the skin that slowly eases free of the body’s confines. Immigration is an information design problem.

Canadians like it on top, Life

About Bordertown

Tomorrow, I’m heading to the Detroit Design Festival, where I’ll be creating my very first art installation for the Bordertown design group. The group has contributed costumes, games, souvenirs from aborted utopias, and other wonderful things. My piece is a series of design fictions about the future of border security in Istanbul. I based those fictions on this Guardian piece…

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Canadians like it on top, Good news, everybody!, Life, Meta

I have successfully defended my second master’s thesis.

A long time ago, my medieval studies professor said to me: “So, what are you interested in? What subject do you see yourself spending the rest of your life learning more about?” “…I’m not sure,” I told her. I want to be a novelist, I wanted to say. “I ask because you’re going to have to start thinking about your…

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Meta, This is why we can't have nice things

A rapist in every Jefferies tube: Detroit, design, and our dreams of space

A friend linked me to this stunning gallery of photos at the Guardian of Detroit, in ruins. As noted in the margins, large swathes of Detroit now more closely resemble the set of a post-apocalyptic film than they do an actual city. Aged and beautiful buildings have been left to rot. Even the books are still on library shelves, their…

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Meta

Speaking of cities

Somebody cut a square out of a shopping bag just so that they could smuggle this footage out of China in 1990. It depicts the Kowloon Walled City. The Walled City was an act of spontaneous, collaborative architecture in response to political and social upheaval — a spatial harbinger of what the internet would eventually look like. Naturally, China destroyed…

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